Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Ethics’ Category

The recordings have been released from last week’s Board of Trustee’s meeting (11.17.20), and the Village Attorney’s report contained the following update:

“The only thing I can report is that the ongoing litigation relative to the horse boarding text amendment we’re zeroing in on the close of discovery. We’ve been taking depositions almost every day, and discovery closes next week and thereafter I’m sure you’ll start seeing a flurry of motions. As a matter of fact, Miss Paul becomes a deponent tomorrow.”

To listen to the recording of the November 17th BOT meeting, click here.

Read Full Post »

Petition packets are available for two open Park Board Commissioner seats for the April 6, 2021, Consolidated Election. Those interested in running for a Barrington Hills Park District Commissioner seat must be a registered voter and have been a resident of Barrington Hills for at least one year prior to the election.

To download the petition packet, please click here. If you wish to have the petition packet mailed to your home or schedule an appointment for pick-up, please contact Kim Keper, Administrator, at 847-783-6772 or Kim@bhillsparkd.org.

Circulation Period / September 22, 2020 – December 21, 2020

The circulation period for the Consolidated Election on April 6, 2021, will be open until December 21, 2020.

Filing Period for Petition Packets / December 14 – December 21, 2020

The filing period for petition packets is December 14 – December 21, 2020. Petition packets must be hand-delivered to the Administrator at the Park District Administrative Office, 364 Bateman Road, Barrington Hills, IL 60010, Monday – Friday, 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.  No petitioner packets will be accepted before or after the stated dates and times. The Barrington Hills Park District staff cannot provide any election or legal advice for any petitioners. Petitioners are encouraged to contact their County Clerk’s Office.

Source

Read Full Post »

Though not on their agenda, our Board of Trustees had a general discussion and provided updates on the “InZone” topic at their July meeting. We found the information enlightening, and we encourage residents to take less than ten minutes to listen in on some history and where things stood last week in the matter.

The link to the recording of their discussion can be accessed here.

Read Full Post »

Audio recordings of Tuesday evenings Board of Trustees meeting have been posted to the Village website. To access the recordings, click here.

Related: Another Roadblock For InZone Project Founder Terrance Wallace, Who Plans To Bring Boys From Violent Neighborhoods To Barrington Hills Mansion

Read Full Post »

Terrance Wallace is seen being escorted out of the MacArthur room Tuesday evening during the monthly Board of Trustees meeting.

A youth pastor from Chicago has taken dual-guardianship of several young men from some of the city’s most underserved neighborhoods and has allowed them to live in the suburbs where they are offered improved education, discipleship and resources.

Pastor Terrance Wallace, founder of the InZone Projecthelps oversee seven young men living in a suburban home in Wauconda, Illinois, and has brought them into his family in a literal sense. He plans to move over 20 (15 earlier this week) others from the city into a suburban mansion in the affluent Barrington Hills this fall.

Wallace and the family of Angie Mooney, a state education worker, have lived with seven young black men from underserved Chicago communities in Wauconda for over a year. Schools, homes and opportunities are much better in Wauconda compared to the city, Mooney told the Christian Post. 

Plans to bring as many as 25 more boys into the mansion in Barrington Hills, a predominantly white community, this fall has also faced opposition from some community members who argued at a community board meeting this week that “there won’t be oversight” or “protection.” 

“What we’re seeing is a small few who lack the knowledge and experience of having black people in their lives,” Mooney argued. “The education these youth are gaining has created remarkable results in New Zealand and Wauconda. This is what God wanted in Wauconda and will move to Barrington Hills.”

In a Zoom video conference of 193 community members (a recording of which has yet to be made public as promised), 191 responded positively and welcomed InZone’s presence in Barrington Hills, Mooney said. 

Wallace and Mooney discussed their plans to bring the InZone Project to the suburb at the board meeting Tuesday. 

“With what we face as a nation, I think the only way to make America great is to confront our divisions and have conversations with each other,” he said. “We face challenges but I’m strengthened by the Lord to continue to charge forward.”

Read more of The Christian Post story here.

Editorial note: In addition to being a pastor, Wallace’s website states he is a, “motivational speaker, management consultant, innovator, mentor, entrepreneur, change agent and visionary.” 

Read Full Post »

It was long considered illegal to leave your horse unattended on the streets of Arlington Heights without having it securely fastened somewhere.

How long ago? Until this week.

The village’s lawyer found the antiquated rule on unattended equines and other “draft animals” when she went to update village code about negligent and distracted driving, a far more common occurrence in 21st-century suburbia than horses running loose through the streets.

“I think this may be the last vestige of something that’s truly, truly, truly old,” said Robin Ward, the village’s in-house counsel.

Ward was surprised when she found the old section of municipal code because much of it had been cleaned up during a re-codification in 1995. Before that, the code was updated in the 1960s. But the horse rule likely predates that, into the 1920s, Ward said.

Read more here.

Read Full Post »

Federal and local officials have gotten thousands of fraud complaints. Stimulus checks will create another tidal wave of fraud, authorities warn.

As opportunists and scam artists look to make a quick buck off the COVID-19 pandemic, hundreds of Chicagoans are inundating City Hall with complaints: $80 toilet paper, $50 hand sanitizer bottles and $15 jugs of vinegar.

And while price gouging is the most prevalent complaint, experts are sounding the alarm on bogus cures, fake deals on protective gear and con artists posing as government officials.

“This is the worst I’ve seen, and I’ve been doing this for 32 years,” said Steve Bernas, CEO of Better Business Bureau of Chicago and Northern Illinois. “I’ve never seen a calamity that would affect so many.”

Through Monday, the Federal Trade Commission fielded more than 540 fraud complaints related to the outbreak in Illinois, according to the agency. The Illinois attorney general’s office has reported handling almost 1,300 price-gouging reports.

And in Chicago, city officials have issued two civil citations for price gouging out of more than 400 complaints filed in March through mid-April, according to a spokesman for the city’s business affairs department. In 2019, there were only two complaints of price gouging the entire year, he said.

Read more from the Better Government Association here.

Read Full Post »

The Barrington Hills Bulletin Board claims to be, “AN ALTERNATE RESOURCE OUTLET FOR LOCAL BARRINGTON HILLS RESIDENTS TO READ, COMMENT AND REACT TO NEWS AND TOPICS WITH THE INTENT TO EDUCATE, PROVIDE AWARENESS, TRANSPARENCY AND ACCOUNTABILITY TO RESIDENTS IN A UNCENSORED FORMAT.”

The Barrington Hills Bulletin Board posts fabrications, typo-ridden incoherent ramblings and now offers a new feature to their minimally followed blog; censorship of comments that are posted on Facebook (“…some comments may have been filtered out”).

As for the offensive comment that was, “filtered out”?

“Paragraphs and proper grammar and punctuation would be nice.”

So much for transparency.

Read Full Post »

A flyer advertising the rental home at 346 Old Sutton Road in Barrington Hills is pictured March 10, 2020 outside the business where Cook County treasurer’s office records show the property’s tax bills are sent. The home became a crime scene after a Chicago man was shot and killed there March 7.(Pioneer Press / Pioneer Press)

Less than two weeks before a Chicago man was shot and killed at an Airbnb rental home in Barrington Hills, village officials discussed at a meeting the issue of short-term rentals.

Village officials discussed the issue at the Feb. 24 Village Board meeting, according to an audio recording of the meeting.

They mentioned nearby Lake Barrington’s decision a few years back to ban short-term rental after an early-morning shooting in April 2016 that left two people injured.

Ultimately, the Barrington Hills Village Board decided to wait for more information and research on what other communities have done.

According to village attorney Mary Dickson, the village code does not explicitly address short-term rentals, but it says that property in the residential district is only allowed for residential use, not commercial use. She said the fact that the owner did not live in the house and was only going to use it as a rental violates the code.

Dickson said the property owners were made aware of this violation prior to March 6.

Read more from the Chicago Tribune here.

Related:NEW! Solitude Ranch w/Indoor Pool, Event Friendly! $599 per night

Read Full Post »

Cook County Democratic State’s Attorney candidates, from left, Bill Conway, Bob Fioretti, Donna More and incumbent Kim Foxx meet with the Sun-Times Editorial Board in early February. (Rich Hein/Sun-Times)

On March 17, Democratic primary voters in Illinois can choose between Kim Foxx, Bill Conway, Donna More and Bob Fioretti for Cook County State’s Attorney. The winner will be the Democratic Party’s nominee for the general election Nov. 3.

The Chicago Sun-Times Editorial Board sent the candidates a list of questions to find out their views on a range of issues. Here are their responses:

The civil division of the U.S. attorney’s office collects judgments that return to taxpayers three times more money than the budget of the office. The Cook County state’s attorney’s civil division recovers far less money. Why is that? What would you do about it?

Bill Conway: In her first year alone, our current State’s Attorney approved nearly $80 million in property tax appeals, millions of which went to clients of her donors and allies. That money doesn’t just come out of nowhere — it’s drained from local governments. When she approved nearly $2 million in refunds to Ed Burke’s client, more than half came out of the budget for Barrington schools. I am open to evaluating the finances of our civil division, but first we need to stop funneling taxpayer dollars to the politically connected.

Read the entire Chicago Sun-Times question and answer session here.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: