Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘News Media’ Category

“The Barrington Hills Police Department has been notified by the Cook County Department of Transportation and Highways that Bateman Road, between Bateman Circle North and South, will be temporarily closed to all traffic to facilitate the replacement of a failing culvert.

The closure is scheduled to begin tomorrow morning, Wednesday, December 2nd and the roadway is tentatively planned to be re-opened on Friday, December 4th. During this period, through traffic should avoid this area and utilize alternative routes, such as the posted detour. Your cooperation and patience is appreciated.”

Read Full Post »

Effective Tuesday, all driver’s license offices in the state will be closed through December 6th.

Illinois’ drivers services facilities will close for in-person business for three weeks starting Tuesday because of the statewide surge in COVID-19 cases.

Secretary of State Jesse White’s office announced the statewide closures of the state’s Driver Services facilities on Friday and urged the public to take advantage of online services.

The closures for in-person business will begin Tuesday, with the locations set to reopen December 7th in an effort to help protect staff amid the ongoing increase in coronavirus cases.

For more info visit CyberDriveIllinois.

Read Full Post »

“Earlier this year, Illinois lawmakers enacted emergency changes in the state’s election law that applied only to the Nov. 3, 2020 election. Designed to promote safe voting during the COVID-19 pandemic, these changes included expanded vote by mail, more early voting hours, and secure drop boxes for mail ballots.

As of Nov. 2, nearly 1.8 million mail ballots had been received by election authorities and more than 1.8 million people had participated in early in-person voting—meaning nearly 3.6 million votes were cast before Election Day. In 2016, early voting and mail ballots totaled about 1.9 million.

How did those changes work for you? What can Illinois learn from this election? With voting behind us, it’s time to consider whether any or all of the changes should be made permanent. 

The Better Government Association would like your input to help shape recommendations for future elections. Please help us by taking our brief survey: 

TAKE SURVEY

If you do not wish to use the survey form, you can still share your experiences; just send an email to policyteam@bettergov.org with the subject My 2020 Voting Experience.

Thank you!”

Read Full Post »

Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan

When Illinois voters rejected Gov. J.B. Pritzker’s request for permission to alter income taxes, they twice defied the wealthy governor, embattled House Speaker Michael Madigan and the dominant Democratic majority in Springfield.

They voted No on a constitutional amendment to switch from a flat tax to a graduated tax. In doing so, they said No to the defining characteristic of this state’s Democratic problem-solving, which tends to be: throw more money at it. Streamline government? Consolidate taxing bodies? Allow voters to enact term limits? No, just raise taxes or create new ones.

From such moments of voter frustration, political rebellions can be born. There is no question in our minds that Madigan has overstayed his tenure as speaker and represents an obstacle, rather than the agent of change, for Illinois, which must fix its broken finances. Adding pressure: U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin on Wednesday and Pritzker on Thursday joined us in saying, time for Madigan to step down as party chairman.

Election Day provided several more signs that Illinoisans are willing to challenge the ossified, self-centered and damaging fiscal policies of Madigan and the Dems. Madigan, who is linked to an unfolding federal corruption investigation, saw Republicans appear to take two House seats from his supermajority. Not a big change, but every loss means something, even given the Democrats’ overwhelming position.

Read the full Chicago Tribune editorial here.

Read Full Post »

Marty McLaughlin is the clear choice when casting your vote for state representative for the 52nd district. As village president in Barrington Hills, Marty has worked tirelessly to streamline government, resolve pension issues, lower taxes and recognize opposing views. His financial background and pension expertise will help bring reform and responsibility to Illinois’s disastrous overspending and overtaxing. Our state is in crisis and needs a known leader not a Madigan-funded rookie.

Vote for Marty McLaughlin. He will represent our interests in Springfield, not Madigan’s or other special interest groups’ agendas.

Don Spry, Barrington Hills

Source

Read Full Post »

On September 26th, The League of Women Voters (LWV) of the Palatine Area, lwvpalatinearea.org, conducted a virtual non-partisan candidate forum for three candidates running for the 52nd District of the Illinois House of Representatives; Martin McLaughlinAlia Sarfraz and Marci Suelzer. The YouTube recording of the meeting can be viewed here.

We listened intently to the recording and felt we would be remiss if we did not share at least one excerpt we believe is critical for voters to hear or read. The LWV asked candidates to,

“Think of a person that is, or has served in Springfield, that’s made an impact for the better in our state.”

Marci Suelzer’s response to this simple question was,

Marci Suelzer

I’m somewhat at a disadvantage in this question in that I did not grow up in Illinois. But I do think that Governor Pritzker has made an impact in saving lives in Illinois.

I wish that I had a better base of historical knowledge to go back two decades or whatever, but I simply don’t.”

The question and her response can be heard here.

Though she admittedly lacks experience, that has not stopped significant contributions to Suelzer’s campaign which only began less than three months ago. Her campaign committee has amassed upwards of $400,000, primarily from Democratic Party of Illinois ($129k), Democratic Majority ($94k), LIUNA Chicago Laborers ($58k), Chicago Regional Council of Carpenters PAC ($58k) and Friends to Elect Kathleen Willis ($45k).

Clearly with this overabundance of political funding, Marci Suelzer does not need to worry about her lack of experience, since if she is elected, her well-financed handlers will tell her how to vote.

Martin McLaughlin has been running for the 52nd District for nearly a year with funding of about 20% of that of his opponent. What matters most when considering which candidate to vote for in an election;

  • (a) one who has been successfully leading a Village for eight years or
  • (b) one who, although inexperienced, has substantial financial backing from the current State leadership?

You decide!

Campaign finance references: Marci Suelzer Campaign Committee, Martin McLaughlin For State Representative

Read Full Post »

The contest ahead of a Nov. 3 vote on Gov. J.B. Pritzker’s proposed amendment to the Illinois Constitution remains close. There are many interesting paths forward depending on the eventual outcome of this vote.

The fight over the graduated income tax—or the “Fair Tax,” as Gov. J.B. Pritzker branded it—has rightly been called a battle of the billionaires.

But it’s not just billionaires like Pritzker and his chief opponent on the tax, Citadel founder Ken Griffin, who have big stakes in the tax vote. All of us do.

The contest ahead of a Nov. 3 vote on Pritzker’s proposed amendment to the Illinois Constitution remains close. A source familiar with daily polling data from the pro-amendment side told me the projected outcome is within the margin of error of the polls, too close to call.

Other facts support this. Lt. Gov. Juliana Stratton recently warned about a possible 20 percent tax hike on everyone if the amendment fails. The threat would not be needed if the vote were secure.

Griffin late last month poured another $26.8 million into the campaign to stop the amendment. He wouldn’t have doubled his initial outlay if the outcome weren’t still in play.

It’s astounding the contest is close. The “fair tax” is a soak-the-rich appeal to raise taxes on the top 3 percent of earners. The remaining 97 percent are told their taxes will drop or stay the same. The 6 million taxpayers expecting lower or level tax bills should overwhelm the 190,000 in the top 3 percent who would face a tax hike.

Of course, politics is more than math. It requires understanding the hopes and fears of people, their sense of whom to trust and what to believe. Those concerns help explain why Pritzker’s proposal is not faring better.

Read more from the Better Government Association here.

Read Full Post »

Without consensus on safety, liquefied natural gas needs another look

The Daily Herald and leaders of several of our suburbs were among those arguing years ago that crude oil shipments by train should be restricted to newer, stronger tank cars that are more likely to withstand a derailment or crash without rupturing, exploding and burning.

That viewpoint largely prevailed, with new requirements unveiled in 2015 that mitigate the risk.

But now the federal government is upping the ante, exposing towns along freight rail lines to potential new danger with the judgment that now that tank cars are safer, they can be used to move material that is more volatile.

The U.S. Department of Transportation over the summer authorized railroads to haul liquefied natural gas around the country, even in the face of the National Transportation Safety Board questioning whether doing so would be safe.

Natural gas is a chameleon, turning liquid at -260 degrees and taking up 1/600th of the space it requires as a gas, making it cheaper to transport. If the gas gets overheated and the tank ruptures, such as following a derailment or crash, it can explode violently into a fireball that will keep burning until the fuel is gone.

Read on here.

Read Full Post »

This is the Tribune Editorial Board’s second installment of endorsements for contested Illinois House races in the Nov. 3 general election.

52nd District

Think it’s tough trying to get things done in Springfield? Try Barrington Hills.

When Republican Marty McLaughlin became mayor in 2013, the Village Board split on issues was 5-2 and McLaughlin was one of the two minority votes. Still, he got his initiatives through, including a consolidation of 911 services that saved taxpayers millions of dollars. As an investment manager, he knows money.

And he knows that because of the pandemic, revenue from state taxes will be a sliver of what they were before. Other states, he says, have decided to slash spending to brace for less money coming in. That’s the course Illinois should take as well, McLaughlin says.

McLaughlin says. His opponent, Island Lake Democrat Marci Suelzer, is a business executive and a licensed mental health counselor. Her skill set is extensive, but McLaughlin is endorsed.

Read the rest of the Chicago Tribune Editorial Board’s endorsements here.

Read Full Post »

To the Editor:

For the second time in three weeks, Democratic signs have been vandalized at the crossroads of Plum Tree, Old Hunt and Algonquin roads in Fox River Grove.

Do we not have free speech in this community?

Bullying and vandalism to express political preference are perfect examples of what is wrong with the current state of affairs in our formerly civilized democracy.

Eileen Milano

Barrington Hills

Source

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: