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Archive for the ‘Resident Spotlights’ Category

The architect of Water Tower Place and many midcentury houses and churches designed this one in Barrington Hills with a vertical emphasis that complements the trees on the wooded site. 

A brick and glass modernist house in Barrington Hills designed in the mid-1960s by Ed Dart, one of Chicago’s great modernist architects, is on the market for the first time in more than 25 years.

Dart, whose best-known work is the soaring 74-story Water Tower Place, also emphasized the vertical element of this house on Brinker Road, letting it complement tall trees on the site. Both inside and out, he used Chicago common brick for an earthen connection.

The interior’s ample windows of glass and long catwalks on the second and third stories “give you sweeping views of the trees and the lake from any angle,” said Giacomo Antonini, who owns the 3,900-square-foot house on 6 acres.

“It still delights me,” 28 years after he bought the home with his now-deceased wife, he said.

Read more from Crain’s Chicago Business here.

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Barrington Hills resident Angela Wilcox

The focus in Barrington Unit District 220 leading up to the April 2 election is on the district’s ambitious referendum asking for $185 million for renovations and building projects throughout the school system.

School board President Brian Battle of Barrington is stepping down after 16 years on the board and Joseph Ruffolo of South Barrington is leaving after eight. That’s a lot of experience to give up, especially since the new board will be grappling either with how to proceed with all of the district’s building projects or how to retrench if those projects fail to gain voter approval.

Five candidates are on the ballot, and all appear to be capable. We were impressed all-around by the level of constructive conversation during the group’s interview with a representative of our Editorial Board. Each candidate clearly is focused on the welfare of the students in the school system.

All the candidates are supporting the referendum, although some would have preferred, for practical reasons, a lower price tag.

Read the full Daily Herald endorsements here.

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Hidden away in boxes and barns — or merely hanging in sumptuous plain sight — the gorgeous chandeliers and fixtures of the Uptown Theatre have been vacationing these past few years in Barrington Hills.

They have been cared for by an eccentric but loving crew of collectors, restorers and guardians, rescued from avaricious thieves and the neglect of a convicted slumlord as if they were evacuees rushed to safety from a war zone.

And — on Tuesday of this week, under the careful eyes of most of those who have cared for them for so long — they all began their journey back to Uptown, Chicago, home.

We were there to watch.

Read more from the Chicago Tribune here.

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When Barrington Hills Village President Martin McLaughlin volunteered to participate in a dunk tank during the recent “The Hills are Alive Fall Festival,” he did so with a village police officer in mind.

Shortly after he situated himself in the dunk tank on Sept. 30., youngster Susie Bongiorno hit the target and dunked McLaughlin into the water below.

Proceeds this year from the dunk tank, as well as food and beverage sales during the village’s annual fall community festival, went to an ongoing effort to raise funds for Jeremy Hensler, a police officer in Barrington Hills who recently was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

“(Bongiorno) threw a strike. I coached her on our softball team,” McLaughlin said of the dunk tank experience, adding how an estimated crowd of 600 attended the festival. “We think that’s pretty good attendance for a village with 1,100 homes.”

But the featured element of Barrington Hills’ sixth annual fall festival was supporting Hensler, who also is a member of the Northern Illinois Police Alarm System — a group of suburban police departments in the Chicago area, officials said.

“He was one of our highest-trained, well-qualified officers,” McLaughlin said of Hensler.

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McLaughlin said the Dunk Tank ended up generating about $500 in proceeds. Organizers also collected donations through vendors’ food and beverage sales at the event, he said. Timmerman’s Equestrian Drill Team, of Island Lake, also performed for the festivalgoers.

Other activities included a climbing rock wall, an interactive animal show and a make-your-own ice cream area, organizers said.

The entire Barrington Courier-Review article can be seen here.

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BHRR 2

 

Hundreds of cyclists are expected to join military veterans and first responders for the annual Barrington Honor Ride and Run, Sunday August 12.

The self-paced, noncompetitive bike ride on routes with lengths of 14, 33 and 47 miles benefits Project Hero, a nonprofit organization that helps veterans and first responders affected by physical injury, post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury. The event is highlighted by riders using hand cycles, recumbent cycles, custom tandems and traditional road bikes.

Check-in and day-of registration begins at 7 a.m. at the Barrington Hills Park District, 361 Bateman Road, followed by a ceremony at 8 a.m., ride at 8:15 a.m., cross-country trail run and fun walk at 9 a.m., and festival with food, music and family fun at 11 a.m. To register, visit projecthero.org.

To see the full article in the Daily Herald, click here.

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This news comes via the Barrington Hills Police Department:

“Barrington Hills Police Department (BHPD) Officer Jeremy Hensler was recently diagnosed with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also commonly referred to as Lou Gehrig’s disease, which is progressively debilitating and eventually terminal. As we all know, lives, priorities, and future plans can change in an instant and this is sadly the case for Officer Hensler.

Jeremy is a 13-year veteran of BHPD and served five years as a police officer in Richardson, Texas before moving to Illinois with his wife and young daughter. His daughter is now 15 years old, beginning her high school years and is the light of Jeremy’s life.

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BHPD Officer Jeremy Hensler

Jeremy has spent all of his adult life in public service and he has gone above and beyond in his career at BHPD, serving 12 years as a Northern Illinois Police Alarm System (NIPAS) Emergency Services Team (EST) sniper. Jeremy is also a 10-year veteran of the United States Marine Corps in which he served as an infantry rifleman in the 1st Battalion 9th Regiment at Camp Pendleton, California – consequently, he is very proud and was initially reluctant in allowing Department members to organize a request for assistance on his behalf.

Jeremy is currently on an administrative desk assignment and is in the process of obtaining a non-duty-related disability. He will need progressively more care and assistance during the course of this terrible disease. While we all pray for a miracle cure or remission, we also realistically know that the financial strain on Jeremy is something he should not need to worry about.

Any assistance you may provide to assist Jeremy in facing this difficult disease will be greatly appreciated by him, his daughter, and the entire Barrington Hills Police Department staff.”

Interested parties may contribute to Officer Hensler’s Go Fund Me page here.

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Screen Shot 2018-06-18 at 7.28.02 PM Barrington Hills’ Sanfilippo estate is a popular venue for elegant, charitable fundraising parties, but Tuesday it was all about scientific research in the property’s spring-fed creek by Shedd Aquarium experts and a local nonprofit conservation group.

In collaboration with the Sanfilippo family, the Barrington Area Conservation Trust organized the monitoring of Spring Creek to sample fish populations to determine abundance, density and species composition. Conservation trust Executive Director Lisa Woolford said the organization is helping the family legally protect a “big stretch” of its land from development in perpetuity.

“So, part of what we do is we identify as many plant, insect and animal species as we can as part of the project,” Woolford said during a break from slogging through Spring Creek in waders. “And we put it into a nice, big, hefty report so we know exactly what it is we’re preserving.”

To read the full text of the Daily Herald feature, click here.

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