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Archive for the ‘Illinois State Board of Elections’ Category

OBH Capture

As previously reported, Brian Cecola has likely won the race for Village President (See “Cecola headed for victory in Barrington Hills president race”).

Here are the unofficial results for Village Board of Trustees:

  • David Riff  445
  • Thomas W. Strauss 428
  • Laura S. Ekstrom 467
  • Robert M Zubak 366
  • Brent Joseph Burval 349
  • Paula Jacobsen 389

County totals are seen below:

Cook

Cook County

Kane

Kane County

Lake Results

Lake County

McHenry Resilts

McHenry County

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There are a number of exceptionally qualified candidates running for office in the upcoming Consolidated Elections April 6th.    

Following is a summary of candidates running for various offices in the order they appear on the ballots for those offices. The Observer has noted those candidates we endorse with a check mark.

Early voting is available to registered voters now through Election Day.

Pres VBH

Trustee VBH

220 VBH 1

HC VBH

BAL VBH

BHPD VBH

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OBH 1

The Barrington Hills Observer wholeheartedly endorses Brian Cecola for Village of Barrington Hills President, as well as David Riff, Tom Strauss and Laura Ekstrom for Village Trustees in the April 6th Consolidated Election.

Early voting starts this morning for the April 6, 2021 Consolidated Elections.  For information on where to cast your ballot between now and Election Day, click on your county below:

We’ll be publishing our official endorsements soon. In the meantime, feel free to use and share the sample ballot below noting our recommendations:

Sample Better

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Fast Tines 1

Political committees must abide by Illinois State Board of Elections transparency rules.

Earlier this week, we posted some helpful reminders to area political candidates of their campaign reporting responsibilities with the Illinois State Board of Elections (ISBE).  This will be our second (in what may become a series) posting of helpful hints on campaign transparency due to one (apparent) repeat offender.

The ISBE rules clearly state:

“Any committee that makes an expenditure for any kind of communication directed at voters and mentioning the name of a candidate in the next upcoming election must ensure that the communication clearly identifies the committee as having paid for it. This applies to any committee that pays for any part of the advertisement, including its production and distribution.” 

Well, residents are now receiving a mailing from a candidate committee (a portion pictured below) that does not appear to adhere to these rules. We previously noted that this candidate’s campaign committee signs display no state mandated committee identification either.  

DK Violation

A campaign mailers sent to residents recently does not disclose the campaign committee that paid for it.

Common sense dictates that if one is running for elected office that every opportunity for campaign advertising with the candidate’s name on it would be maximized, especially when it comes to taking credit for who paid for it (at least one would think that).

This particular candidate, however, either fancies himself as a rebel, or perhaps isn’t taking this election as seriously as he should considering the high office he’s seeking.  Another possibility is much more troubling, however, and that is he may not wish to disclose who is actually paying for his advertisements.

Related:Some helpful campaign tips for area candidates

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Village HallThe Daily Herald has published profiles of the two candidates running for Village President.  In ballot order, click on any of their names to read the bio they wrote for submission:

Election Day is April 6th.

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There are plenty of candidates running for various offices this year, and we thought we’d help them out by reminding them of some basic, common-sense rules established by the Illinois State Board of Elections (ISBE) for transparent, full disclosure campaigning.  

These rules apply to first time candidates or those currently in office.

Campaign Signs and Websites

Political campaign signs must, “…clearly identifies the committee as having paid for it.”  The example shown above does not, and that’s an ISBE No-No (even if it does have a union label on it). 

If omissions occur, the candidate committee could opt to replace the signs, affix labels to signs with corrected campaign disclosure or possibly face objection(s) filed with the ISBE by doing nothing.

Campaign websites (such as a portion of the one above) should also clearly state the name of the committee that paid for it.

Those who have run for office before should know these rules. We’re just looking out for those new to campaigning.

Either way, the Illinois State Board of Elections website can be found here.

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