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The Barrington Hills portion of the District 300 attendance boundary is outlined above.

Algonquin-based Community Unit District 300 leaders have reversed an earlier plan to reopen schools for in-person instruction and instead will start the school year Aug. 17 with fully remote learning due a rise in COVID-19 cases in Kane County.

Originally, officials had hoped to bring back elementary and middle school students to a normal five-day schedule with some modifications while high schools followed a hybrid model.

Evolving guidance from state education and health officials and an increase in COVID-19 cases across the region forced the district to reevaluate in-person instruction.

For now, the district plans to be in remote learning mode for students in pre-kindergarten through 12th grade through the first quarter, which ends Oct. 9.

Read more here.

Editorial note: Make no mistake, District 220 and now District 300’s decisions in less than 24 hours to scrap their plans for some classroom education this fall are primarily union driven.

 

Gov. J.B. Pritzker announced restrictions to recreational sports that would suspend activities like football, basketball, soccer and volleyball competitive matches in the coming months to reduce the spread of COVID-19.

The sports restrictions go into effect Aug. 15 and apply to all youth and adult recreational sports, including schools, recreational leagues and park district programs.

As a result, the Illinois High School Association is shifting football, girls volleyball and boys soccer seasons to the spring with the hope that the pandemic’s grip will have lessened by 2021.

“I think most people realized you would not have a contact sport like football taking place now,” Barrington High School Athletic Director Mike Obuszt said. “It (spring football) will be something different happening, but I like it. Rather than just say, ‘We are canceling football this year,’ they found a spot in the calendar where they can give it a try.”

Read more here. The new sports guidelines (subject to change) are as follows:

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District 220 Superintendent Brian Harris

After announcing earlier this month that the new school year would start in-person with an option for remote learning, Barrington School District 220 officials revised that Wednesday and said it will now be all virtual.

“As guidelines from the Illinois State Board of Education, the Illinois Department of Public Health, county health departments, and other health organizations continue to evolve, we have concluded the ‘Roadmap to Reopening’ as presented at the July 14 Board of Education meeting is not attainable,” Superintendent Brian Harris said in an electronic letter to parents and stakeholders distributed Wednesday.

Following that July 14 meeting, district families were given about 10 days to decide whether their children would attend school in-person – wearing masks – or spend five hours a day doing distance learning when the new academic year starts Aug. 20.

That had been the message Harris delivered at the board meeting as he presented the district’s Roadmap to Reopening plan to board members and nearly 900 viewers who watched the virtual meeting on YouTube. He said then that, “we really want to get all our kids back in a safe environment.”

But in his notification Tuesday, Harris said the only option, for now, is to drop the plan for kids to return to the school buildings.

Read the Chicago Tribune account of what happened here.

District 220 issued to following statement:

“Dear Barrington 220 community,

I appreciate your patience and understanding as we have been navigating Barrington 220’s Roadmap to Reopening for the 2020-21 school year. Thank you to all of the stakeholder groups who have provided the district with feedback and asked questions over the past several weeks. As you can imagine, each family has its own unique situation and there are many factors to consider which not only impact our students and staff, but also the entire Barrington area community.

Over the past couple of months our administrators, teaching staff and support staff have worked together to figure out the best ways to educate our students, given this uncertain reality we all face. Board members have also provided input during Board meetings.

As guidelines from the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE), the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH), county health departments, and other health organizations continue to evolve, we have concluded the Roadmap to Reopening as presented at the July 14 Board of Education meeting is not attainable. Starting the 2020-21 school year in a primarily Distance Learning environment is necessary in order to meet current public health guidelines and keep all students and staff healthy. This is an extremely difficult decision and while I know many families and staff will welcome the change, I realize many others will not.

The Board of Education has scheduled a special meeting to review revisions to Barrington 220’s Roadmap to Reopening and provide further context about the district’s Distance Learning guidelines, which may be adjusted based on further guidance from the agencies listed above.

The meeting will begin at 6:30 pm on Tuesday, August 4 in the BMS-Station cafeteria. Due to public health guidelines, capacity will be limited to 50 people in the room. Masks are required if you choose to attend the meeting in person. Click here if you would like to watch the meeting live on YouTube.

I am confident we will maintain excellent teaching and learning in Barrington 220, while we provide a safe and healthy environment for students and staff. We will continue updating the community as the situation changes.”

After initially announcing plans to welcome students back to campus when school opens next month, Barrington Area Unit District 220 officials reversed course Wednesday and announced they would offer only remote learning when classes resume.

Reversing course on its plan to let parents choose between in-person and online classes, Barrington Area Unit School District 220 announced Wednesday that it would offer only remote learning when school opens next month.

In a message to the school community announcing the change, Superintendent Brian Harris said officials concluded that the original plan to welcome some students back on campus is not attainable.

“This is an extremely difficult decision and while I know many families and staff will welcome the change, I realize many others will not,” Harris wrote.

The remote learning plan is necessary to meet current public health guidelines and keep all students and staff healthy, he added.

Read more from the Daily Herald here.

At their July 21st monthly meeting, after extended discussion our Board of Trustees approved an amended burning ordinance. The key components established with the new ordinance are:

  • The location for any open burning shall not be less than 100 feet from any structure and provisions shall be made to prevent the fire from spreading to within 100 feet of any structure.
  • No open burn shall be more than 10 feet by 10 feet by 10 feet in dimension.
  • No open burn shall burn in excess of six (6) hours in any calendar day.
  • Landscape burns shall be limited to the hours of 8:00 AM to 9:00 PM.
  • Any open burn shall be constantly attended by an individual at least 18 years of age until the fire is completely extinguished.

The ordnance was approved by a partisan vote of 5-2. Trustee Jacobsen inexplicably voted against the ordinance at the last minute despite the fact that she verbally agreed with most if not all of the changes made by a majority of fellow trustees prior to the vote.

A copy of the ordinance can be viewed here.

Audio recordings of Tuesday evenings Board of Trustees meeting have been posted to the Village website. To access the recordings, click here.

Related: Another Roadblock For InZone Project Founder Terrance Wallace, Who Plans To Bring Boys From Violent Neighborhoods To Barrington Hills Mansion

Algonquin Village President John Schmitt has died.

Algonquin Trustee Debby Sosine called him a fabulous village president and said on Saturday that she was very sad to confirm the news of his death.

“He was such a great leader and we are just sorely going to miss him,” Sosine said. “He was a personal friend of mine and other board members. It’s just a shock.”

A memory that Sosine says will stick with her was when she and Schmitt were able to drive a stretch of road that recently opened along Longmeadow Parkway to Route 31.

Read more here.

Terrance Wallace is seen being escorted out of the MacArthur room Tuesday evening during the monthly Board of Trustees meeting.

A youth pastor from Chicago has taken dual-guardianship of several young men from some of the city’s most underserved neighborhoods and has allowed them to live in the suburbs where they are offered improved education, discipleship and resources.

Pastor Terrance Wallace, founder of the InZone Projecthelps oversee seven young men living in a suburban home in Wauconda, Illinois, and has brought them into his family in a literal sense. He plans to move over 20 (15 earlier this week) others from the city into a suburban mansion in the affluent Barrington Hills this fall.

Wallace and the family of Angie Mooney, a state education worker, have lived with seven young black men from underserved Chicago communities in Wauconda for over a year. Schools, homes and opportunities are much better in Wauconda compared to the city, Mooney told the Christian Post. 

Plans to bring as many as 25 more boys into the mansion in Barrington Hills, a predominantly white community, this fall has also faced opposition from some community members who argued at a community board meeting this week that “there won’t be oversight” or “protection.” 

“What we’re seeing is a small few who lack the knowledge and experience of having black people in their lives,” Mooney argued. “The education these youth are gaining has created remarkable results in New Zealand and Wauconda. This is what God wanted in Wauconda and will move to Barrington Hills.”

In a Zoom video conference of 193 community members (a recording of which has yet to be made public as promised), 191 responded positively and welcomed InZone’s presence in Barrington Hills, Mooney said. 

Wallace and Mooney discussed their plans to bring the InZone Project to the suburb at the board meeting Tuesday. 

“With what we face as a nation, I think the only way to make America great is to confront our divisions and have conversations with each other,” he said. “We face challenges but I’m strengthened by the Lord to continue to charge forward.”

Read more of The Christian Post story here.

Editorial note: In addition to being a pastor, Wallace’s website states he is a, “motivational speaker, management consultant, innovator, mentor, entrepreneur, change agent and visionary.” 

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McHenry County Board Chairman Jack Franks sent a letter to Algonquin Township officials on Thursday calling for a referendum on the elimination of the township to be added to the Nov. 3 ballot.

According to the letter, the next meeting of the township’s board of trustees falls just five days before the Aug. 17 deadline for local governmental entities to add referenda to the November ballot.

“I firmly believe that taxpayers should have the ultimate say to choose how they are governed – or in the case of township government, whether it is still needed in the 21st century,” Franks said in a news release sent out Thursday.

In response, Algonquin Township Supervisor Charles Lutzow said Franks could have taken it upon himself to petition to get a referendum on the November ballot if he felt strongly about it.

“He had months to get this on the ballot, all you have to do is get some signatures,” Lutzow said Thursday, remarking that the request seemed a bit last-minute.

Read more here.

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