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Coyote

This coyote is recovering at Flint Creek Wildlife Rehabilitation in Barrington after being struck by a car, lodged in its grille and dragged early Sunday morning. (Courtesy of Flint Creek Wildlife Rehabilitation)

A coyote that was struck by a vehicle, dragged across pavement and trapped for more than two hours in the car’s grille may survive its injuries after being freed by Lake County officials Sunday morning.

The coyote’s rear right foot was mangled after it was dragged across the pavement, but those taking care of him remain hopeful he’ll pull through.

“He is missing parts of his toes, but shockingly he has no broken legs,” said Dawn Keller Monday afternoon. “He is on pain meds, anti-inflammatories, antibiotics and vitamin shots. And we’re using other products to try to stave off infection and keep him comfortable.”

Keller, the founder and director of Barrington-based Flint Creek Wildlife Rehabilitation, said Lake County officials told her the coyote was struck by the car around 5 a.m.

Keller said the driver of the car knew an animal was hit but the driver decided not to stop and investigate, and upon returning home did not take a look at the front of the car to see if it had been damaged by hitting the animal.

Had the driver looked, the coyote would have been seen pinned into the car’s grille but still holding on to life.

Instead, it was a neighbor who noticed the suffering coyote and alerted authorities, who arrived at around 7:30 a.m., Keller said.

Read more here.

Long Grove

A box truck became struck the Long Grove Covered Bridge near Robert Parker Coffin Road and Schaeffer Road in Long Grove on Monday. | Photo: Chatter Box of Long Grove

A box truck was heavily damaged after it hit the historic bridge in Long Grove Monday afternoon. The bridge has been hit over 30 times now.

The white Chevrolet box truck hit the bridge, located at Robert Parker Coffin Road and Schaeffer Road in Long Grove, around 1 p.m. Monday.

The truck appeared to be traveling eastbound on Robert Parker Coffin Road when it struck the bridge’s canopy.

The bridge suffered visible damage. The truck’s windshield was shattered, the cab was pushed downwards and the middle section of the truck was also damaged.

The bridge was formerly named the Long Grove Covered Bridge.

It was renamed on Thursday to the Robert Parker Coffin Bridge, named after Robert Parker Coffin, who designed the bridge cover.

The Chatter Box of Long Grove, which is located down the street from the bridge, told Lake and McHenry County Scanner that the box truck driver was uninjured.

More here.

220 Books

Just last week in Barrington, the school board voted to keep “Flame” and “This Book Is Gay,” two books about gender and sexuality. In a 4-3 vote, the board ultimately accepted a recommendation by a school advisory committee of experts to keep the books after determining they didn’t meet the standard for obscenity and pornography.

A glass shelf displaying some of the most notable challenged books in the country adorns the entryway of the Chicago Public Library’s Lincoln Belmont branch. The books are surrounded by yellow tape and red signs that inevitably steer the attention of those who walk inside to the titles that have been banned, or attempted to be banned, in other libraries across the country.

But instead of taking the books off the shelves, visitors at the library were invited — in celebration of Banned Book Week 2022 — to learn about each one of them and encourage discussions about the topics for which they were banned. City Lit Theater Company joined the efforts by presenting a theatrical display of iconic banned and challenged books, allowing people to make their own decision on whether to read them.

Last week, city and Chicago Public Library officials declared Chicago a sanctuary city for those stories, by establishing “Book Sanctuaries” across the city’s 77 distinct community areas and 81 library branches. That entails a commitment to expand local access to banned or challenged books through library programming.

Meanwhile, attempts to ban books across the country — including in suburban Illinois — are escalating at a rate never seen since the American Library Association began tracking data more than 20 years ago, according its most recent report.

Just last week in Barrington, the school board voted to keep “Flame” and “This Book Is Gay,” two books about gender and sexuality.

In a 4-3 vote, the board ultimately accepted a recommendation by a school advisory committee of experts to keep the books after determining they didn’t meet the standard for obscenity and pornography.

Erin Chan Ding, a board member, said the removal of the books could potentially impact young people that could identify as LGBTQ students. And though the books may have strong imagery and words, it should be up to parents if their children read them.

In August, Barrington school board members also voted to keep “Gender Queer” in the Barrington High School library.

“We’re making these books available, but we’re not actively incorporating the books that were challenged into the curriculum,” said Chan Ding, a mother to an eight and a fourth grader.

As a mother, she said, she understands that some parents question the books and want to prevent access to them. “I have empathy for parents who disagree with our decision and I acknowledge and fully recognize that there’s a full spectrum of opinions. … It is a parent’s responsibility and role to do what is best for their own child but that doesn’t mean restricting access to other people.”

Read more here.

Related: District 220 posts April 2023 Election Candidate’s Guide,District 220 Board of Education meets tonight

9.22 BOT

Our Village Board of Trustees will be conducting their regular monthly meeting beginning this evening at 6:30 PM. A copy of the agenda can be viewed and downloaded here.

Nightmare

According to the Village of Barrington:

“Monday (9/26) the Contractor will complete milling work on Main Street adjacent to the CN railroad tracks under the supervision of CN railroad flaggers and will begin paving operations at one or both of these railroad crossings, which will continue on Tuesday (9/27).

There will be delays associated with lane closures in this area during this work. The Contractor’s flaggers will maintain two-way traffic. Manhole grade adjustments will also be underway on Main Street throughout the Village during the rest of the week and into the beginning of next week.

Be alert when driving or walking in the construction zone, as this work will raise the structures approximately 2″ above the pavement so they are at the final roadway surface elevation. The placement of the final asphalt surface is anticipated to begin at Ela Road and move westbound beginning early next week.”

Lake Jail

The Major Crime Task Force is investigating the death of a Barrington man who was found unresponsive in his cell at the Lake County Jail in Waukegan Friday evening.

A Lake County sheriff’s corrections officer was conducting rounds in Pod 1 East around 8:34 p.m. Friday.

He observed an inmate, a 51-year-old Barrington man, laying on his bed in what appeared to be an unresponsive state.

The corrections officer knocked on the door several times but the inmate did not respond, according to Lake County Sheriff’s Office Deputy Chief Christopher Covelli.

The corrections officer entered the inmate’s cell and attempted to wake him but the inmate remained unresponsive.

More here.

Election Illinois Voting

Passage of Amendment 1, on the November ballot, would put Illinoisans’ pocketbooks at risk of another hit during a time when it is already difficult to make ends meet.

You may wonder why anyone would be against the proposed change to the Illinois Constitution at the top of the Nov. 8 ballot that proponents call the “Workers’ Rights Amendment.”

Don’t ask me — ask Deb Cohorst.

Cohorst is a mother, grandmother, retiree and resident of Effingham, Illinois. For now. If the deceptively dubbed “Workers’ Rights Amendment,” or Amendment 1, passes, Cohorst might be forced to leave the state she has called home for almost 40 years.

“My husband and I really don’t want to leave, but we may not have a choice,” Cohorst said. “This amendment would be devastating to not only my family but any family.”

Why? Amendment 1 is a potential property tax hike in disguise that could hurt low-income families and seniors on fixed incomes. In a state that leads the nation in foreclosures, homeowners can’t afford higher costs.

Amendment 1 would allow government union bosses to collectively bargain over new, broad contract topics such as “economic welfare,” which could include anything from affordable housing to preventing advancements in technology. The more subjects available for government unions to bargain over and the longer negotiations take, the greater the potential cost to all Illinois workers — which would be reflected in higher property tax bills.

In Cook County, the median homeowner could pay at least an additional $2,935 in property taxes during the next four years if voters approve Amendment 1. In Cohorst’s home of Effingham County, property taxes on the typical home would rise by $743.

Property taxes already eat up approximately 7% of Cohorst’s fixed income. Increases make life in Illinois less feasible for her family.

“It scares me we may have to move,” she said. “I have friends in neighboring states, and they cannot believe what we’re paying in property taxes. I am paying more for the property tax on my half-acre lot than my three out-of-state friends’ property taxes combined.”

Read the full Chicago Sun*Times opinion here.

Bar In The Sky

Magnicity, the global operator and creator of innovative, experiential attractions high above notable cities, celebrates the grand opening of CloudBar on the 94th floor of the former John Hancock Center (875 N. Michigan Ave.). Situated over 1,000 feet above The Magnificent Mile at 360 CHICAGO Observation Deck, the new concept bar unveiled reimagines how tourist destinations feature hyper-local artisans and food and beverage partnerships to magnify a city’s authentic best.

“We want each Magnicity location to act as a true city ambassador for our guests – encouraging exploration of the vibrant neighborhoods within our cities and forging new adventures and experiences. We are thrilled to introduce our brand-new bar concept with CloudBar,” says Alexia Vettier, CEO of Magnicity, a Paris-based company that owns and operates 360 CHICAGO and other Magnicity experiences in landmark locations around the world.

Expect sky-high style and an exclusive showcase of Chicago’s makers and artisans curated from the diverse communities admired in the city’s distinct neighborhoods.

The $2M+ renovation and opening of CloudBar represents the most recent of a ten-year, $14M investment strategy at 360 CHICAGO, all with a goal of centering authentic Chicago stories and experiences in every aspect of the guest journey.

Release continues here.

2023 Seats Up For Reelection

Angela Wilcox, Leah Collister-Lazzari and Barry Altshuler

District 220 has posted an Election Guide on their website for those considering running for three seats on the Board of Education in April, 2023.  Current board members whose terms end in April are Angela Wilcox, Leah Collister-Lazzari and Barry Altshuler.

Angela Wilcox was elected to the Board of Education in 2015, and has provided exemplary service to the 220 community.  Should she run for a third term, there is absolutely no question she would have our endorsement.  However, as a Barrington Hills resident, we would like her to consider running for our Board of Trustees instead.

Wilcox has always provided well considered reasoning and discourse in her role on the Board of Education, which would be a welcome addition to the BOT. Further, it’s always been helpful to have an actively practicing attorney on the Board of Trustees.

Leah Collister-Lazzari and Barry Altshuler were elected in 2019.

The 2023 Election Guide can be viewed and downloaded here.

Polo Development

Naperville’s planning and zoning Commission recommended the city council approve a proposal to annex 110 acres at the Naperville Polo Club, located at the northeast corner of 119th Street and Route 59, for a 401-home subdivision.

A Naperville commission is recommending the city council approve a plan to annex land at the Naperville Polo Club and develop it into a residential subdivision.

A representative from Pulte Home Co. detailed the proposal at Wednesday’s planning and zoning commission meeting to build 252 single-family houses and 149 townhouses on the property located at the northeast corner of 119th Street and Route 59.

As part of the project, Naperville officials would need to annex the parcel that’s currently in unincorporated Will County.

Despite concerns from nearby residents about home density and added congestion on 119th Street, commissioners unanimously recommended the plan to the city council.

“I think we’ve done, at this point in time, just about everything we could possibly do to put the best possible plan for Polo Club before you,” Russell Whitaker, the attorney representing Pulte, told the commissioners.

The proposal includes 38% of open space, land donated to the Naperville Park District, two multipurpose athletic fields and a stormwater management area donated to Will County Forest Preserve District, according to Whitaker.

Pulte would build four different home styles at differing price points, including a percentage of affordable housing dedicated to households earning $100,000 to $125,000 a year. Those homes would cost $352,000 to $440,000.

Read more here.

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